Q is for Questioning Quails – A to Z Blog Challenge

We are pleased to participate in the A to Z Blog Challenge (http://www.a-to-zchallenge.com/). The Story Crossroads theme for this year is Beating the Odds…Lucky Folktales Around the World to Brighten Your Day. Each post highlights that the stars aligned and what would have normally been…bad…turned out after all. Considering what we – as humankind – have experienced the past year, how nice is it to remember that all of us can “beat the odds” to some level in our lives.

And we’ll admit now…some are actually myths, legends, or epics rather than only limited to folktales. So is that a type of “loading the dice”? Ah, but the stories were too wonderful to pass by.

QUAILS-

From Sri Lanka

Quails are often kept as pets in Sri Lanka. The birds are known as shy creatures. People have to be extra careful of mongoose who like to eat the quails. This is a different kind of chicken/fox situation. Though, a quail egg is healthier than eating a chicken egg. Not that you would want to eat quail eggs after this story.

What makes quails dangerous?

A little bird…how dangerous could it be? Well, I barely learned that quail can choose to become poisonous. If you happen to then eat this quail, then your kidneys could be goners. Here’s an article about it: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18963719/.

50-words-or-less summary:

Quail laid egg on rock. Then rock covered egg. Quail begged for help to move rock. Went to Mason, Village Headman, Pig, Vaedda, Timbol, Fire, Water-Pot, Elephant, and Rat. Only when coming upon Cat did it chase the Rat and then all did what they promised. Quail regained egg.

That Quail was lucky when someone finally wanted to help and not have to get something in return. Whew! I may have to rethink how I feel about cats as a result of this story. Yes, Cat enjoyed going after that Rat so there was a “what’s-in-it-for-me”…though still. There were nine others who refused to do anything until there was a “what’s-in-it-for-me” yet Cat saw the opportunity while helped Quail. Lucky Cat and Quail.

Finding the Story:

https://www.wisdomlib.org/south-asia/book/village-folk-tales-of-ceylon-sri-lanka/d/doc6868.html

Please share in the comments…or anything on your mind. While you enjoy this blog, Story Crossroads has year-round offerings with virtual as well as proper-distanced/masked/outdoors.

We are excited for the monthly All Things Story virtual workshop series as well as the hybrid Story Crossroads Festival on May 10-13, 2021 (then viewing beyond the event to June 15, 2021). Interested in deeper articles and e-workbooks plus stories, activities, and recipes? Then pursue Story Crossroads Memberships.

As we are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, you can also support by donating today!

See a teaser of our Story Crossroads Academy. While the video has closed captioning, the “Storytelling Basics in 8 Hours” is free and includes American Sign Language.

P is for Pranking Primates & Perplexing Pirates – A to Z Blog Challenge

We are pleased to participate in the A to Z Blog Challenge (http://www.a-to-zchallenge.com/). The Story Crossroads theme for this year is Beating the Odds…Lucky Folktales Around the World to Brighten Your Day. Each post highlights that the stars aligned and what would have normally been…bad…turned out after all. Considering what we – as humankind – have experienced the past year, how nice is it to remember that all of us can “beat the odds” to some level in our lives.

And we’ll admit now…some are actually myths, legends, or epics rather than only limited to folktales. So is that a type of “loading the dice”? Ah, but the stories were too wonderful to pass by.

PRIMATES-

From Brazil

People noticed that primates were in danger due to a certain highway in Brazil. The court ordered for a special bridge to be built with trees planted on top of it. The primates, such as golden lion tamarins, could then cross without being hit by vehicles. Here is that article that was published on August 7, 2020.

What makes primates dangerous?

Usually we are the more dangerous than primates. Though primates – like monkeys – are sometimes tricksters around the world including in Brazil. Some people fear primates in carrying diseases that transfer easily to humans. When primates become adults, they tend to be more aggressive. But in this story? Well, isn’t nice to have a sense of humor?

50-words-or-less summary:

Garden with fruit trees. Fruit given if know names of trees. Animals asked and fed. No one remembered a tree’s name. Monkey asked old woman. She told him name. Monkey created song with guitar. Asked tree for fruit. Expected delicious. Awful! Monkey shared name to watch others’ reactions. Many laughs.

That Monkey was lucky that no animals wanted revenge to eating awful-tasting fruit…and that it was “safe” fruit despite not the best flavor. As a side note, isn’t that Monkey lucky to have the ability to play guitar. No wonder that Monkey has a great sense of humor.

Finding the Story:

https://www.worldoftales.com/South_American_folktales/South_American_Folktale_12.html#gsc.tab=0

Normally I wouldn’t do a second story…but it was too fun to pass up.

PIRATES-

From Ireland

Irish piracy has been around for at least 14 centuries. Some people have a hard time picturing Irish pirates due to all the movies of the “Pirates of the Caribbean,” yet piracy has only been in that area for 70 years.

What makes pirates dangerous?

Pirates can loot but also take prisoners…or not take prisoners. The common punishment was to execute pirates by hanging. Only if someone is pregnant could such a punishment be avoided.

50-words-or-less summary:

Anne Bonny and Mary Read,” swashbuckled despite the belief that women on a ship was bad luck. Anne and Mary sailed with John “Calico Jack” Rackam. Pirating adventures. Anne and Mary caught. Escaped hanging as “pled the belly.” Jail until could verify pregnancy. Not pregnant. Still lived long lives.

Those two pirate queens were lucky that people were willing to believe they were pregnant when they were not. Even when it was verified nine months later, Anne Bonny and Mary Read still lived long lives.

Finding the Story:

http://www.thewayofthepirates.com/famous-pirates/calico-rackham-jack/

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/if-theres-a-man-among-ye-the-tale-of-pirate-queens-anne-bonny-and-mary-read-45576461/

Please share in the comments…or anything on your mind. While you enjoy this blog, Story Crossroads has year-round offerings with virtual as well as proper-distanced/masked/outdoors.

We are excited for the monthly All Things Story virtual workshop series as well as the hybrid Story Crossroads Festival on May 10-13, 2021 (then viewing beyond the event to June 15, 2021). Interested in deeper articles and e-workbooks plus stories, activities, and recipes? Then pursue Story Crossroads Memberships.

As we are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, you can also support by donating today!

See a teaser of our Story Crossroads Academy. While the video has closed captioning, the “Storytelling Basics in 8 Hours” is free and includes American Sign Language.

Cap’s Off to You!-Cathryn Fairlee (Posthumously) and Celebrating Story

Featuring:  Cathryn Fairlee

Epic-Teller, Mentor, Traveler

Cathryn Fairlee was the expert researcher and performer of epic tales complete with singing. I had the privilege of taking a workshop – in-person and front row – and I was floored by what she knew and was willing to share with us. She traveled to the places she told about and always said, “traveling teaches you history and culture.” From Northern Ireland to China to Mexico and many more, she discovered the world through stories.

I wish I had more personal things to say about Cathryn. I was an avid fan from a distance. I treasure that one workshop. I always dreamed of attending the “Going Deep: Long Traditional Stories Retreat.” Stories told had to be at least an hour long and preferred to be longer than that so that people would have beyond a typical storytelling festival experience. Later, there would be a discussion of symbols and motifs and any number of topics focused on that epic tale. Cathryn Fairlee, while not the founder of that event, was still an important part of it. She will always be important for not only what she told but who she welcomed into this world of epic-telling…and being an epic human being.

When she suffered from vascular cerebral dementia for years, she reached out to other storytellers and gave responsibility for those people to honor and continue to tell the epic. The dementia prevented her from recalling or performing, yet she had the foresight to share and mentor younger yet talented artists. In exchange, she learned skills from the younger generation including the talent to use watercolor and oils.

Ever since 2005, Cathryn was responsible for creating Epic Day that was held biannually. In September 2019, about two weeks before she passed on, that particular Epic Day had a song dedicated to her and an album with photos and memories. The July of the same year, she received the International Story Bridge Award through the National Storytelling Network.

I read some of the comments and memories from people, and someone said that for Halloween 2017, she gathered all the neighborhood kids and told ghost stories. Certainly, a special moment for all.

Some articles, odes, sounds or writings of Cathryn Fairlee:

Ode from the Storytellers of Canada – Conteurs du Canada – https://www.storytellers-conteurs.ca/en/news/Passing-Cathryn-Fairlee.html

Why These Tellers Have Storied Careers – newspaper article on Cathryn Fairlee, published June 2003

Storyteller Cathryn Fairlee fuses culture, dynamic characters and folk to create a change – online article on Cathryn Fairlee, published February 2018

You can learn a lot about a culture through its stories: Cathryn Fairlee – published January 31, 2018

Feral Mom, Feral Writer: Story of a Storyteller (Cathryn Fairlee) and A Musician (Stephen Pryputniewicz) – blog post, published on January 1, 2010

You can listen to Cathryn Fairlee on Spotify, you can listen to a bit without having an account or signing in though you can create a free Spotify account and listen to them all.

Here’s a hint of a story – different than than Celtic ones above – and this time on ReverbNation: https://www.reverbnation.com/cathrynfairlee/songs

Cathryn Fairlee was part of this Story Story Podcast with True Thomas: https://storystorypodcast.com/unusual-pets-cathryne-fairlee-true-thomas/

Some of her academic writings (may need to sign up for sites for free, but still available): https://sonoma.academia.edu/CathrynFairlee

A post by her on Chinese Teahouse Telling on the National Storytelling Network blog: https://storynet.org/chinese-teahouse-telling/

Cathryn Fairlee tells “The Search for Three Magic Words” as part of the Seattle Storytellers Guild’s Kalavala Epic Event on March 25th, 2017 Audio Recording (shared by Barry McWilliams) http://www.eldrbarry.net/epic/kalevala%2006.htm

Event Page: http://www.eldrbarry.net/epic/Kalevala.htm

Cathryn Fairlee and  Mary Louise Chown tell “Princess Badoura and Prince Komarelzima” at the Seattle Storyteller’s Guild 1,001 Nights Epic Event, May 5th, 2018. Audio  Recording (shared by Barry McWilliams):  http://www.eldrbarry.net/epic/1001NightsAudio/Cathryn%20Fairlee%20Princess%20Badoura%20and%20Prince%20Kamarelziman%20%2031.mp3

Event Page: http://www.eldrbarry.net/epic/1001NightsEpic.htm

Do you know a Story Artist who has passed on and want others to remember them? Memories? Pictures? You can submit names and memories of Story Artists who have passed on through our online form. 

I appreciate Cathryn Fairlee with her guidance to many storytellers, especially in telling epic tales through never limiting herself to one way to give. She made sure that the stories she told were passed on to others before passing on. Thank you, Cathryn.

Cathryn still has a story.  You have a story.  We all have stories.

O is for Outwitting Ogres – A to Z Blog Challenge

We are pleased to participate in the A to Z Blog Challenge (http://www.a-to-zchallenge.com/). The Story Crossroads theme for this year is Beating the Odds…Lucky Folktales Around the World to Brighten Your Day. Each post highlights that the stars aligned and what would have normally been…bad…turned out after all. Considering what we – as humankind – have experienced the past year, how nice is it to remember that all of us can “beat the odds” to some level in our lives.

And we’ll admit now…some are actually myths, legends, or epics rather than only limited to folktales. So is that a type of “loading the dice”? Ah, but the stories were too wonderful to pass by.

OGRES-

From Japan

The story mentions “ogre” though sometimes ogres and oni can be confusing for people. An ogre for Japanese lore if much like a big hairy giant that eats humans and other creatures. An oni is a demon and still something to avoid.

What makes ogres dangerous?

Well, as ogres in Japan like to eat humans…yes, that would be dangerous. The ogre in this story has shape-shifting abilities to then better hunt whoever they are after.

50-words-or-less summary:

Ogres thought to be gone. Then ogre discovered. Watanabe rides to face it. Fights. Cuts ogre’s arm. Watanabe placed in box. Old woman came who knew Watanabe. She wished to see arm. She took it, transformed into same ogre, put arm on. Watanabe fought ogre. Watanabe won! Ogre never returned.

That Watanabe was lucky to fight along five others to protect the people from ogres. Then lucky against this one ogre. And then again in another fight. Watanabe was seen as a hero before and now? That admiration and love will continue for generations now.

Finding the Story or about Ogres:

https://products.kitsapsun.com/archive/1999/09-19/0016_tell_me_a_story__the_ogre_s_arm__.html

https://mythus.fandom.com/wiki/Ogre

https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/59737/10-horrifying-demons-and-spirits-japanese-folklore (mentions a mountain ogress)

Please share in the comments…or anything on your mind. While you enjoy this blog, Story Crossroads has year-round offerings with virtual as well as proper-distanced/masked/outdoors.

We are excited for the monthly All Things Story virtual workshop series as well as the hybrid Story Crossroads Festival on May 10-13, 2021 (then viewing beyond the event to June 15, 2021). Interested in deeper articles and e-workbooks plus stories, activities, and recipes? Then pursue Story Crossroads Memberships.

As we are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, you can also support by donating today!

See a teaser of our Story Crossroads Academy. While the video has closed captioning, the “Storytelling Basics in 8 Hours” is free and includes American Sign Language.

N is for Not-What-They-Seem Nariphons – A to Z Blog Challenge

We are pleased to participate in the A to Z Blog Challenge (http://www.a-to-zchallenge.com/). The Story Crossroads theme for this year is Beating the Odds…Lucky Folktales Around the World to Brighten Your Day. Each post highlights that the stars aligned and what would have normally been…bad…turned out after all. Considering what we – as humankind – have experienced the past year, how nice is it to remember that all of us can “beat the odds” to some level in our lives.

And we’ll admit now…some are actually myths, legends, or epics rather than only limited to folktales. So is that a type of “loading the dice”? Ah, but the stories were too wonderful to pass by.

NARIPHONS-

From Thailand

Nariphons are 12 trees that bear fruit that looks like women created by Indra, who is god of gods in Hindu mythology. That’s necessary for you to know before reading the story summary. Though, what is a yogi? In Thailand, a yogi is a traveler and sometimes they travel for so long that they have hermit-like attributes. They do much medication and why someone who does yoga has been known as a yogi. While being alone in the wilderness can be refreshing and satisfying, this story tells of yogis who were not satisfied enough. You may even wonder why I didn’t save this one for the “Y” post. Choices, choices. And a sala? That’s an open pavilion.

What makes nariphons dangerous? Are nariphons really what is dangerous?

Having a tree that bears fruit that appears like women? This seems to fall under “pleasure” versus “pain.” Any harm in it? In this story, this type of fruit saved this couple from a terrible circumstance. Though, if you were deceived by such a thing but then figured it out later…how dangerous would be the aftermath? Hmmm.

50-words-or-less summary:

Indra and family lived in sala. When wife gathered fruit, she could be attached by yogi. Despite being meditative, the yogi were overpowered by lust. Indra created 12 nariphons that bore women-shaped women that looked like his wife. Yogis took those fruit home and saved his wife from attacks.

That wife was lucky that those yogis could be “distracted”…though not sure how I feel about the “how.” Still, I am relieved the wife is safe. This was not a one-time incident. After four months, the yogis attempted again and had to led away by those fruit.

Finding the Story or about Nariphons:

https://amp.en.googl-info.com/1430380/1/nariphon.html

https://www.google.com/books/edition/Thai_Folklore/g2MDngEACAAJ?hl=en

https://www.google.com/books/edition/The_Wonders_of_Thai_Art/28efAAAAMAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=Nariphon&dq=Nariphon&printsec=frontcover

Please share in the comments…or anything on your mind. While you enjoy this blog, Story Crossroads has year-round offerings with virtual as well as proper-distanced/masked/outdoors.

We are excited for the monthly All Things Story virtual workshop series as well as the hybrid Story Crossroads Festival on May 10-13, 2021 (then viewing beyond the event to June 15, 2021). Interested in deeper articles and e-workbooks plus stories, activities, and recipes? Then pursue Story Crossroads Memberships.

As we are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, you can also support by donating today!