What We Learned from Proper-Distanced Events – Part 2 of 5

This is the second of five parts on setting up proper-distanced events. While focusing on storytelling, the information applies to any performing arts or proper-distanced event. Our blog as well as our proper-distanced house concerts with rental of recordings are wonderful sources of information and entertainment.

5-Parts:

  • Part 1 – Distancing & Spacing – REVEALED
  • Part 2 – Sanitation & Other Safety Measures – TODAY
  • Part 3 – Test Runs & Early Set-Ups
  • Part 4 – Relief to Potential Audience
  • Part 5 – Audience Isolation Behaviors

You know that hand sanitizer is a must but there are MUCH MORE to understand and have available.

In fact, this part will be long…but important. You can see an even longer version as a type of checklist by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Order your sanitation supplies early.

Lysol has been extremely popular and hard to get unless you order online or find a local smaller store. While Lysol wipes have been popular, we have loved the spray better. It is faster and not only helps to sanitize the object-in-question but also the surrounding air near it, as COVID-19 is spread through water droplets.

All hand sanitizers are not made equal so be careful whenever buying “off” brand.

You can still get “off” brand, but look at reviews from other people before committing to purchasing it. And…sanitizer does not have to smell pretty. It only has to work. Click here for “Best Hand Sanitizers of 2020” put out by Healthline.

We already warned about performing indoors in a classroom-sized or smaller area in Part 1. Though, what these rooms do have for many Kindergarten and 1st grade classrooms is a sink. Hand-washing has been proven to be MUCH more effective than hand sanitizer. So…if you are working with classroom students, then ask for the teacher to make sure they all wash their hands with soap before walking out of the classroom to the larger indoor or outdoor space.

For festival-sized events, you will want to purchase or rent portable hand washing stations with paper towels (NOT the cloth ring that gets re-used).

Even after this historic time, you may wish for a few of these stations to be part of your regular festival inventory. For example, the Utah Arts Festival has always had many of these portable hand washing stations near the portable toilets. This has always been a smart way for good hygiene. Click here for “Top 10 Portable Handwashing Stations” of 2020 that can be found on Amazon.

Back-up masks must be made available…even if you have already told your attendees to wear masks.

Well-intention audience members could forget. People who prefer not to wear masks could also arrive. You must be insistent and be firm and be willing to guide people in a loving way. Already discuss as an organization/individuals of what the policy would be if someone refuses to wear a mask. There are medical reasons…but rare.

Even someone with asthma can wear a mask. We allow if someone is on the spectrum for Autism or other mental needs. However, someone who purely refuses – despite knowing from all your advertising that masks are required – needs to be politely dismissed. Work out together on the right words to say in that moment.

You will also need to be clear that masks must cover the mouth and nose. Certainly not the chin or chin/barely-the-mouth. Any people who are monitoring the event (emcees, volunteers, etc.) need to know how to nicely remind people how to wear them. If someone is a repeated offender, then, again, know how to politely dismiss someone. It is better to be firm than lenient in this case. We have not experienced this level of refusal or inadequate wearing of masks yet…but have the verbal/mental preparation, if needed.

Discuss with your story artists on what they plan to do for masks.

Performers are allowed to take off their masks if all other safety measures are followed. The performers will still want to wear masks before and after…possibly during.

Many singers are loving the singer’s mask while in the Deaf community you see masks with a window covering so that facial expressions can be seen. Here is a link on how to make one while here are seven kinds one can purchase.

Remember that a face shield only works in combination with a mask.

Only wearing a face shield is not approved in certain buildings or workplaces due to the ineffective way to prevent as does the classic cloth mask. Click here is a study from researchers connected with Florida Atlantic University.

When it comes to sanitizing microphones, please make sure it happens.

People will cringe if there is an emcee followed by a performer and nothing has been done. Well, not everyone will cringe. We would!

We like the quick spray of the Lysol. Some people wipe down with Lysol wipes or something similar. As shared at the beginning of this post, we love the idea of the microphone and the air around it to be sanitized. You miss that part when it is only a wipe-down. If you are worried about stickiness, then you can wipe after the event is done. We have not seen any problems yet.

A microphone is practicaclly required now whether your event is indoors or outdoors. The rule before COVID was always have a microphone outside no matter the size of the audience.

We forgot our own rule when it came to our live Story Camp. We properly distanced the 15 youth (we could not no more than 20 at the park and that included the adults) that took up at least 2-3 classroom sizes. We did not bring a portable microphone. Our two facilitators/presenters had to project and we worried if their voices would last for three days of this camp. Somehow, their voices held. However, this is a different safety measure beyond sanitation: protecting the voices of your talented and valued performers.

The other microphone rule is to have a microphone indoors if there are at least 25 people. The fact that properly spacing 15 youth already takes up 2-3 classroom sizes, then the spacing alone means you need a microphone and a way you will sanitize between people.

Whether indoors or outdoors with a microphone, you will want the minimum 12 feet (or perhaps 13ish feet/4 meters) from the front row as already shared in Part 1.

But you ask, how do we best indicate to the audience of the spacing? What equipment do we need?

The following can work to give visual cues:

  • Wooden stakes, both 3′ and 1′ ones – found at hardware/home improvement stores and really affordable
  • Bright sports discs – used often by little league sports such as soccer and weaving balls around and such, we found a set of two discs for $1.00 at the dollar store and only spent $10 for 20 discs
  • Regular Safety Cones OR Collapsible Safety Cones (our favorites), bit of an investment) – more bulky than the sports discs but can still do the trick
  • Hula Hoops with Carrying Case (holds up to 12 per Case)– think of them like light-weight carpet squares that works whether you are a kid or an adult BUT expensive and ones found in dollar stores sometimes are too small OR the hula hoops are seasonal and found only at certain times of the year
  • Marking Spray Paint – find out if you have permission

By the way, if you do order any of these items on Amazon, please choose Smile Amazon instead and give back to our nonprofit, Story Crossroads.

Of all these options, we LOVED the bright sports discs and the wooden stakes. We cannot always use the wooden stakes or anything that would mark the grass.

With the Story Camp, it was held at the gorgeous International Peace Gardens in Salt Lake City, Utah. No staking or painting of any kind could be used. We used the bright sports discs…but a bit of warning. While setting up, the grounds crew was mowing the grass. We did not think they were mow towards us since we had the space officially reserved. The lawn mower ran over two of our discs before he realized what was happening. And this is why you need more than you need in any situation. We had extra and all was good. Except for bits of orange plastic everywhere. Glad we got that cleaned up before starting!

What of Liability Insurance?

No, we would never use our liability insurance to replace two orange discs worth $1.00.

When Story Crossroads first existed, we focused on special events liability insurance. Since 2018, we have general liability insurance so that it covers beyond our main festival in mid-May and any and all events we do as well as day-to-day volunteer work. Our liability insurance does not cover any vendors. They have their own signed agreement that either they prove to us that they have their own or sign a waiver to hold us harmless.

Yet, COVID-19 has brought up this topic on if it is covered. The answer? No.

When we renew our general liability insurance in February 2021, we will be curious to see if rates are suddenly much higher or there will be some mention of COVID within the policy or at least for an additional premium. For example, “acts of terrorism” is an optional coverage that became more prevalent after September 11, 2001 (also known as 9/11).

Whether free or for a cost, we have people read our Liability and Indemnity Agreement (COVID) and checkmark that it was read and understood. This is during our required pre-registration, which is easier to set-up with a paid registration service like our through Wild Apricot.

We have templates in Word and in PDF that you are welcome to adapt for your needs. These templates and other producer materials can be found here.

In Part 3, we will delve into test runs and set-ups using this equipment and best “backdrops” no matter if inside or outside.

You can make this live event happen. Think with logic and love. Enjoy the energy from a proper-distanced event.

Find our E-Newsletter and Email List Sign-Ups.

See our already-streamed/recorded The Big Why Panel: Historical Storytelling meets Humanities. See our 5-video playlist from the Story Crossroads Spectacular by clicking here.

Join us for our proper-distanced house concerts such as with Nannette Watts in West Jordan, UT on September 18, 2020…or get the recording afterwards.

What We Learned from Proper-Distanced Events – Part 1 of 5

This is the first of five parts on setting up proper-distanced events. While focusing on storytelling, the information applies to any performing arts or proper-distanced event. Our blog as well as our proper-distanced house concerts with rental of recordings are wonderful sources of information and entertainment.

5-Parts:

  • Part 1 – Distancing & Spacing – TODAY
  • Part 2 – Sanitation & Other Safety Measures
  • Part 3 – Test Runs & Early Set-Ups
  • Part 4 – Relief to Potential Audience
  • Part 5 – Audience Isolation Behaviors

You are ready for live performance again…with spacing and masks…and what else?

Nothing beats the intense energy when performing live. Naturally, you want to rush to it as fast as safely possible.

We paused our regular house concert series from March – July 2020 and then rephased into proper-distanced house concerts on August 14. That same week, we offered both live and virtual story camps.

And people thanked us.

So what works for spacing?

No longer did it feel like indoor house concerts could be considered. The most we packed into my home was 45 people. If proper-distancing, I feel like I can only have 10 people. True, that is better than nothing.

Think of bigger areas.

Outdoors combined with proper-distancing and masks is the triple net of safety.

Even if your area is fine with people not wearing masks outside, we decided to be ultra-sensitive to it as we–as an organization and as individuals–put the safety of our story artists and audience first.

Here are large outdoor spaces that can work for proper-distancing:

  • Backyards – do you or an Executive Director, Board Member, Volunteer, Amazing Citizen have a large space that can hold at least 30+ people with spacing of 6 feet/2 meters front/back/sides (think spacing of 3+ classrooms)
  • Parking Lots – largest ones tend to be of churches, schools, events centers – does anyone you know work or volunteer at one of these places to “strike a deal”? – can work with folding chairs and/or parked cars like drive-in theater/movies
  • Parks – depending on your code/phase for your area, find out how many people you can gather in one place – 20? 50? 100? – receive permission/permit from park to allow the gathering
  • School Grounds – not parking lot, but the grassy parts – again, do you know someone with that school to “strike a deal”?
  • Any other Big & Open Areas – does not always have to be a field as hills can work as a natural amphitheater even if not originally set-up as an official venue

Here are large indoor spaces to consider for proper-distancing:

  • Chapel area of Churches – probably could fit 20-40 with 6 feet/2 meters front/back/sides
  • School Gymnasiums, Auditoriums or Cafeterias- probably a quarter of original capacity, if that
  • Super Large Living Rooms – most people do not have super large living rooms but I saw one once that could easily hold 100+ people, which probably could hold 40 at most now with proper-distancing
  • Event Centers – again, double-check on what actual capacity would be compared to original capacity
  • On Top of Roofs – if gated/safe, number of possible audience members depends on spacing
  • Any Other Large Buildings with Chapel/Ballroom/Large Gathering Areas – figure out number for proper-distancing by multiplying 1/4 by the original capacity number

During this time, avoid classroom-sized areas.

You will still get people offering an opportunity. Brainstorm with them on larger areas that both of you can easily access–and hopefully for free or minimal cost.

How far apart is the performer from the front row?

  • Minimum 12 feet (or perhaps 13ish feet/4 meters)
  • Some places are more 15 feet to 20 feet, especially if the performer admits to being a “spitter”

What about spacing between rows?

  • 6 feet/2 meters is the minimum – though strangely some students are back in the classroom and lucky to be 3 feet apart! – but don’t let that be the standard for the performing artists
  • Feel free to space out more if you wish

Need some studies or articles to support the importance of spacing/distancing?:

We will delve into sanitation, good habits, equipment, and liability/indemnity to make things safer for everyone in Part 2.

You can make this live event happen. Think with logic and love. Enjoy the energy from a proper-distanced event.

Find our E-Newsletter and Email List Sign-Ups.

See our already-streamed/recorded The Big Why Panel: Historical Storytelling meets Humanities. See our 5-video playlist from the Story Crossroads Spectacular by clicking here.

Join us for our proper-distanced house concerts such as with Nannette Watts in West Jordan, UT on September 18, 2020…or get the recording afterwards.

The Checklist: How to Set up Virtual Events – Part 5 of 5

This is the fifth of five parts on setting up online events. While focusing on storytelling, the information applies to any performing arts or virtual event. Our blog as well as our All Things Story Virtual Workshop Series are wonderful professional development resources.

5-Parts:

  • Part 1 – Event Type, Audience, Timing & Pricing – REVEALED
  • Part 2 – Choosing the Right Platform & Registration – REVEALED
  • Part 3 – Rapports & Introductions – REVEALED
  • Part 4 – Test Runs, Sound Checks & Logistics – REVEALED
  • Part 5 – Feedback Forms and Follow-Ups – TODAY

You’re done, right? The event is done…or is it?

Take the opportunity to learn, grow, and improve. Most likely, this event is one of many you will do.

Besides finding out what people loved best, you can notice what is NOT mentioned. This is as much of an eye-opener as anything else.

No matter if live or virtual, we have always involved feedback forms. Though, we always had these forms as hard copies with two other options – Large Print and Spanish. This was the first year we did all the feedback forms through online means.

Even when virtual events are free, having a type of registration and/or a “plan on virtually attending” form allows for an email to ask a couple questions.

However, we prefer to use Google Forms.

Here are common questions on ours…please adapt as you wish or use the wording exactly. As long as this is helpful, we are happy.

  • Basics – Name, Position/Role (teacher, parent, storyteller, etc.), city/country, Zipcode
  • Email – if do not already have from registration (helpful if people decide to be part of Story Crossroads E-Newsletter, email lists, etc.)
  • How did you enjoy _____________________ (performance/workshop/presentation)? What did you like best? Find interesting?
  • Did ________________________ (performance/workshop/presentation) meet your expectations? Why or why not?
  • What action(s) will you now take with ________________ (storytelling/writing/acting/singing, etc.) as a result of experiencing ____________________ (performance/workshop/presentation)?
  • Does Story Crossroads have permission to quote your comments on publications, fan page, websites, etc.?
  • Would you like to be added to any of our email lists and/or volunteer for Story Crossroads in some way? (list out the options – people can fill out as many as wished – only ask if not part of registration)
  • How did you learn about this virtual opportunity? (ask if not part of registration)
  • Do you have questions or comments?

We find that feedback forms that are any longer…have a harder time for completed ones to be submitted.

Sometimes, all you want is a simple 1 to 5 or 1 to 10 rating sent in an email. No Google Forms. Nothing complicated. Yet, this is so much more than what most people do. We noticed this approach for “History in Person: A Virtual Chautauqua Festival.”

While having many sessions, the St. Louis Storytelling Festival gave a link to a Google Form after each session. They posted it at the beginning of the livestream and then at the end.

We recommend posting at least five times per session:

  • Beginning, close or part of the welcoming message
  • Three times in the middle – spaced between real-time comments from other participants
  • End, close or part of the thank you/come again/upcoming events after this message

Once you have responses to the feedback forms, actually add people to your E-newsletters, email lists, or reach out if they wish to volunteer within a day or two.

For those who do not respond–or as a general email to all your registrants–you can send a “last chance/farewell” that you will no longer email them unless they chose to be part of your lists.

Who knows? Those people could be lifetime fans, tell their friends and family, and more lifetime fans cheer on what you are doing.

All because you realized that the end is not the end. Only a beginning.

You can make this virtual. You can realize your dreams for it.

Our next 5-part blog series will be “What We Learned About Proper-Distanced Events” on rephasing into live performance with safety measures.

Find our E-Newsletter and Email List Sign-Ups.

See our already-streamed/recorded The Big Why Panel: Historical Storytelling meets Humanities. See our 5-video playlist from the Story Crossroads Spectacular by clicking here.

Participate or present as part of the All Things Story Virtual Workshop Series that kicks off Monday, September 7, 2020 with Simon Brooks.

The Checklist: How to Set up Virtual Events – Part 4 of 5

This is the fourth of five parts on setting up online events. While focusing on storytelling, the information applies to any performing arts or virtual event. Our blog as well as our All Things Story Virtual Workshop Series are wonderful professional development resources.

5-Parts:

  • Part 1 – Event Type, Audience, Timing & Pricing – REVEALED
  • Part 2 – Choosing the Right Platform & Registration – REVEALED
  • Part 3 – Rapports & Introductions – REVEALED
  • Part 4 – Test Runs, Sound Checks & Logistics – TODAY
  • Part 5 – Feedback Forms and Follow-Ups

Test Runs are different than Sound Checks. And do you get headaches with Logistics? Discover what we learned.

The timing and length of time dedicated is the biggest difference between Test Runs and Sound Checks.

The “Run” part of Test Run means you could “run” to the store (or online ordering) in case something needs to be ordered to make everything smoother.

The “Check” part of Sound Check means you are checkmarking that things are still smooth since that Test Run and happens the day of the virtual event itself.

Having Successful Test Run(s):

  • Schedule Test Run a month before the actual virtual event…though can “squeeze” one in within one week before actual event, but then you can run into trouble if someone needs to purchase better equipment/lighting as a result
  • Allow for the Test Run to take about 30 minutes while people want it to be a rehearsal and be the same length of the virtual event – and thus you would moving away from a “Test Run” and into the “Rehearsal” realm
  • Doing early Test Run makes it possible to have a 2nd Test Run if things do more “interesting” than you expected
  • Invite all presenters and co-hosts/emcees involved and give clear instructions and plenty of reminders
  • Have all presenters listed in your phone so you can text in case anyone forgot or miscalculated for the time zone
  • Of the 30-minute or so Test Run, take about 15 minutes to check and play around with lighting/sound/positioning while the last 15 minutes could be to live-stream (whether or not this is what you plan to do for the virtual event) that acts as a test AND a type of promo/anticipation for the event
  • People who are NOT part of the Test Run can still participated and be scheduled to watch for any live-streaming of test runs – have these people give comments within the feed of the virtual event AND send you group text for anyone else assigned to be “watching”
  • Always connect to the Ethernet/modem and NOT wi-fi
  • Not all Ethernet cables are equal – they have “categories” with number 6 being the best for the time being for fastest ability plus you can even get 100′ cable so you can set up in the room that you wish with your laptop

Thanks to storyteller Donna Washington, I learned about this 5 1/2 -minute video that visually shows you what you need to do for Test Runs. I agree with it all except for always worrying about centering on the screen. Sometimes it is smart to be on the side depending on your needs. AND…the best 90-minute version of the know-how is through Simon Brooks and his workshop “Breaking Boundaries of the Screen: Presenting On-line” on Monday, September 7, 2020 from 9-10:30am MDT that is part of our All Things Story Virtual Workshop Series.

Having Successful Sound Check:

  • Schedule your Sound Check at least 30 minutes before the virtual event
  • All presenter(s) and hosts/co-hosts/emcees need to be part of this Sound Check
  • Make sure sound/lighting/positioning work even though checked during your Test Run(s)
  • Keep the length to 15 minutes so you can allow early people to jump on early and open it up to mingling

Logistics Before and During:

  • Create/update/receive any paperwork with presenter(s) such as – contract, digital release (live-streaming and/or recording and/or picture taking/screen-shots) – see templates you can adapt at the Story Producer Resources page
  • Assign 2-4 hosts/co-hosts to divide the following roles – emceeing, admitting people into the virtual space (if applicable), watching real-time comments and/or chat within the virtual space, sharing screens
  • Develop “scenes” to share within the virtual space such as listing of funders, volunteers, upcoming events – can be video or picture files – can create using Canva (free and paid versions) – you can see examples of what we did for “The Big Why Panel: Historical Storytelling meets Humanities” (live) versus what we had for scenes for “Story Crossroads Spectacular: Youth & Community Tellers” (pre-recorded)
  • Give updates as people register to your volunteers/Board as well as to the presenter(s) – this motivates people to continue to promote the event – registrations always go up when you keep track as a team
  • Receive any handout(s) as well as any slide shows–if being used–at least a couple days before the event – offer to double-check for any typos so there is time to fix

Continue with us to Part 5 for the Logistics after the event in “Feedback Forms & Follow-Ups.”

You can make this virtual. You can realize your dreams for it.

Find our E-Newsletter and Email List Sign-Ups.

See our already-streamed/recorded The Big Why Panel: Historical Storytelling meets Humanities. See our 5-video playlist from the Story Crossroads Spectacular by clicking here.

Participate or present as part of the All Things Story Virtual Workshop Series that kicks off Monday, September 7, 2020 with Simon Brooks.

The Checklist: How to Set up Virtual Events – Part 3 of 5

This is the third of five parts on setting up online events. While focusing on storytelling, the information applies to any performing arts or virtual event. Our blog as well as our All Things Story Virtual Workshop Series are wonderful professional development resources.

5-Parts:

  • Part 1 – Event Type, Audience, Timing & Pricing – REVEALED
  • Part 2 – Choosing the Right Platform & Registration – REVEALED
  • Part 3 – Rapports & Introductions – TODAY
  • Part 4 – Test Runs, Sound Checks & Logistics
  • Part 5 – Feedback Forms and Follow-Ups

Once registration is under way, what details will your attendees need?Potential participants?

People want a confirmation of registration right away.

For our first virtual workshops, we asked for proof of payment. This was doing the opposite of what we discovered would be better for the future.

An automatic email is sent whenever people pay online whether done through Square, Wild Apricot, or any number of registration systems. Had we paused and thought about that, we would not need to add another step such as “proof of payment.”

In the beginning, we also chose to confirm and send out our first email to registrants a couple days before the event. This made some people nervous who registered a month or more before. Automated emails are better unless you plan on checking and sending manual emails each day.

The following is the most important information in the form of 1-3 emails to registrants (3 emails is best -day of payment, day before, day-of an hour before):

  • Registration confirmation (same day of payment)
  • Repeat of date/time/title of virtual event WITH time zone as well as ability to convert time zones (explained in Part 1, )
  • Any link(s) and passcode(s) needed to access the virtual event OR web addresses to find event if live-streamed (recommend same day of payment and repeated for reminder email day before as well as day-of event)
  • Any training, if any, for attendees to watch before event (such as our 5-minute Zoom Basics training)
  • Indication if there will be mingling/early entry before as well as after the virtual event
  • Easy contact of the host – telephone to call/text as well as email checked every day

Consider these optional add-ons to your emails to registrants:

  • Any special line or two from the presenter(s) as a welcome message (different than message from the host/you)
  • Reminder of any extra benefits to those who paid suggested price or higher such as access to video/audio from event
  • Pdf handout if virtual workshop or educational in any way (perhaps better to send after the event rather than before)
  • Any other message(s) from the organization of other upcoming events
  • Whatever you wish…though the longer the messages get, the less likely to be read completely

With your registrants cared for, then think about who has yet to sign up for your event.

Here is a “to do” list that can be as long or as short as you feel necessary:

  1. Add to your website
    • Dedicate events page that is easy to find
    • Include countdown on the homepage either as a widget or through plug-ins (hint of plug-ins that work for WordPress websites or search online for plug-ins available to whatever company hosts your website)
  2. Create and execute countdown plan for social media/emails/texts/calls
    • Countdown can mean a post every day once you reach a month away or at least a one-week countdown
    • Popular use of countdown is spotlighting the skills of the presenter(s)
    • Typical phrases are “3 days before…” or “last chance”
    • You can have help in scheduling these posts ahead of time and peruse “15 Of the Best Social Media Posting and Scheduling Tools” by Influencer MarketingHub
  3. List event on online calendars – local, national, international
  4. Discover other ways to spread the word such as “30 Creative Event Promotion Ideas to Increase Attendance” on the Eventbrite Blog
  5. Develop and send out press releases
    • Live and virtual events need press releases – does your website have an easy “Press Kit” page seen from the home page?
    • Create 1-page or shorter press release in Word or similar software that is easy to copy and past as well as tailor for the different TV, radio, blog, magazine, newspaper, podcast contacts
    • Include most important details at top
      • Date(s) of Event
      • “Media Advisory” and “For Immediate Release”
      • Contact Name, Telephone/Email
    • Include more details below
      • Eye-catching yet informative title
      • County/State/Country followed by no more than 2-4 paragraphs
      • At-a-glance listing of – What, When, Where, Cost, Audience, For more info (website)
      • Any funders/grants given to make the event possible
    • Never send out press releases on Mondays or Fridays…but better to send out than not at all; Tuesdays-Thursdays are best from 9am-Noon of the media’s time zone
    • Feel free to send out press releases for different events once a month to keep rapport and familiarity with the media

Time will fly by.

We never accomplish all we intended to do to promote an event. Still, we are happy with what we can do.

Give yourself permission to NOT get everything done that you had wished to do. Celebrate from the small to the big items you check off your lists.

Continue with us with Part 4 to “Test Runs, Sound Checks & Logistics” for those important actions that make a difference before show time.

You can make this virtual. You can realize your dreams for it.

Find our E-Newsletter and Email List Sign-Ups.

See our already-streamed/recorded The Big Why Panel: Historical Storytelling meets Humanities. See our 5-video playlist from the Story Crossroads Spectacular by clicking here.

Participate or present as part of the All Things Story Virtual Workshop Series that kicks off Monday, September 7, 2020 with Simon Brooks.