V is for Vexing Viracocha – A to Z Blog Challenge

We are pleased to participate in the A to Z Blog Challenge (http://www.a-to-zchallenge.com/). The Story Crossroads theme for this year is Beating the Odds…Lucky Folktales Around the World to Brighten Your Day. Each post highlights that the stars aligned and what would have normally been…bad…turned out after all. Considering what we – as humankind – have experienced the past year, how nice is it to remember that all of us can “beat the odds” to some level in our lives.

And we’ll admit now…some are actually myths, legends, or epics rather than only limited to folktales. So is that a type of “loading the dice”? Ah, but the stories were too wonderful to pass by.

Viracocha-

From Incas

The Incas took up most of the western part of South America. While they could invent and do many feats, they did not have a written language. We are lucky to know the stories we do. The emperor was seen as the descendent of the sun. Hopefully, the emperor gives credit to Viracocha.

What makes Viracocha dangerous?

Of all the Incan gods and goddesses, Viracocha is the god of gods. While he does not interfere too much in human’s lives, he is one not to turn angry. He could snap people out of existence. Though, he prefers to be benevolent.

50-words-or-less summary:

Viracocha created creatures before sun, moon, or stars. Creatures were too giant. Viarcocha made smaller. Creatures forgot Viracocha. Mad! Turned some to stone, drowned others. Last three beings re-created world. Forgotten again! Mad! Fire! People begged forgiveness. Viarcocha put out fire. Created special rocks people loved. Left in the sea.

Those people were lucky to be given chances by Viarcocha. Not all were lucky, but some were able to be part of that second world and enjoyed special stones. Interestingly, Viarcocha then left the people never to be seen again but promised a messenger while he walked into the seaspray. Thus, even the name “Viarcocha” means seaspray.

Finding the Story:

“Viarcocha’s People” in Myths and Legends of Incas by Daniele Kuss – https://books.google.com/books/about/Myths_and_Legends_of_Incas.html?id=rUHzNwAACAAJ

Please share in the comments…or anything on your mind. While you enjoy this blog, Story Crossroads has year-round offerings with virtual as well as proper-distanced/masked/outdoors.

We are excited for the monthly All Things Story virtual workshop series as well as the hybrid Story Crossroads Festival on May 10-13, 2021 (then viewing beyond the event to June 15, 2021). Interested in deeper articles and e-workbooks plus stories, activities, and recipes? Then pursue Story Crossroads Memberships.

As we are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, you can also support by donating today!

See a teaser of our Story Crossroads Academy. While the video has closed captioning, the “Storytelling Basics in 8 Hours” is free and includes American Sign Language.

U is for Understanding Undead-Unknowns – A to Z Blog Challenge

We are pleased to participate in the A to Z Blog Challenge (http://www.a-to-zchallenge.com/). The Story Crossroads theme for this year is Beating the Odds…Lucky Folktales Around the World to Brighten Your Day. Each post highlights that the stars aligned and what would have normally been…bad…turned out after all. Considering what we – as humankind – have experienced the past year, how nice is it to remember that all of us can “beat the odds” to some level in our lives.

And we’ll admit now…some are actually myths, legends, or epics rather than only limited to folktales. So is that a type of “loading the dice”? Ah, but the stories were too wonderful to pass by.

UNDEAD UNKNOWNS-

From Jamaica

Underworld beings or strange beings from the unknown are found in any cultures. With Jamaica, duppies are commonly known as unhappy or restless spirits who mainly want to cause harm. Some duppies come in the form of people you once knew and could aim to help. Rolling calves is another strange undead that can be a demon calf wrapped in chains that–well–rolls. These rolling calves can block your path.

What makes the undead dangerous?

The undead…can possibly make you dead or part of the undead itself. So, yeah, can be dangerous. If you survive an encounter with the undead, then count yourself lucky.

50-words-or-less summary:

Woman’s husband died and became duppy. Time passed. Woman remarried. Duppy visited. Hoped to be intimate. She knew it must not be so or she would go barren or birth dead children. Woman escaped. Duppy realized mistake. She could still bear children with her living husband.

That woman was lucky to have two wonderful men in her life. Sometimes one needs to get remarried. And thankfully the duppy figured out he was not alive anymore and let her enjoy life with her new husband.

Finding the Story (or at least the Folklore):

https://www.jstor.org/stable/537633?seq=1

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duppy

https://www.real-jamaica-vacations.com/jamaican-folk-tales.html

Please share in the comments…or anything on your mind. While you enjoy this blog, Story Crossroads has year-round offerings with virtual as well as proper-distanced/masked/outdoors.

We are excited for the monthly All Things Story virtual workshop series as well as the hybrid Story Crossroads Festival on May 10-13, 2021 (then viewing beyond the event to June 15, 2021). Interested in deeper articles and e-workbooks plus stories, activities, and recipes? Then pursue Story Crossroads Memberships.

As we are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, you can also support by donating today!

See a teaser of our Story Crossroads Academy. While the video has closed captioning, the “Storytelling Basics in 8 Hours” is free and includes American Sign Language.

T is for Tricking Tigers – A to Z Blog Challenge

We are pleased to participate in the A to Z Blog Challenge (http://www.a-to-zchallenge.com/). The Story Crossroads theme for this year is Beating the Odds…Lucky Folktales Around the World to Brighten Your Day. Each post highlights that the stars aligned and what would have normally been…bad…turned out after all. Considering what we – as humankind – have experienced the past year, how nice is it to remember that all of us can “beat the odds” to some level in our lives.

And we’ll admit now…some are actually myths, legends, or epics rather than only limited to folktales. So is that a type of “loading the dice”? Ah, but the stories were too wonderful to pass by.

TIGERS-

From Hmong (Miao)

The Hmong people come mainly from the mountains in China, Vietnam, Laos, and Thailand. The Hmong are one of several ethnic groups considered the Miao. Many Hmong stories are harder to locate in published form as the written version of their language did not become formal until the 1950s. Stories were mainly passed from person to person. This story is one of the “classics” of the Hmong people most specifically within Laos. One of the worst things you can tell someone is to yell for a tiger to bite someone. This is more intense than any swear words.

What makes tigers dangerous?

Tigers have teeth and claws. They can camouflage with their black stripes within jungles or tall grass. Obvious, right? Though, the tiger is this Hmong story also has magic and does not simply camouflage with the land but SHAPESHIFTS to look like humans. Yikes!

50-words-or-less summary:

Girl born with magic. Tiger eats her father. Tiger shapeshifts into father. Girl senses and convinces mother. Tosses chili peppers into tiger’s eyes. Rushes to stream. Girl calls to crow to tell villagers to come with weapons. Tiger surrounded. Girl uses magic to make tiger disappear using power of love.

That girl was lucky with her magic but also with a kind family and neighbors. Yes, it was still sad about her father. Yet, amazingly, the girl tapped into the love of everyone around her but especially her father to be able to make the tiger disappear and save everyone else.

Finding the Story:

Listen to the story – https://www.yourclassical.org/episode/2020/09/01/classical-kids-storytime-yer-and-the-tiger

Please share in the comments…or anything on your mind. While you enjoy this blog, Story Crossroads has year-round offerings with virtual as well as proper-distanced/masked/outdoors.

We are excited for the monthly All Things Story virtual workshop series as well as the hybrid Story Crossroads Festival on May 10-13, 2021 (then viewing beyond the event to June 15, 2021). Interested in deeper articles and e-workbooks plus stories, activities, and recipes? Then pursue Story Crossroads Memberships.

As we are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, you can also support by donating today!

See a teaser of our Story Crossroads Academy. While the video has closed captioning, the “Storytelling Basics in 8 Hours” is free and includes American Sign Language.

S is for Soothsaying Spirits & Slip-upping Snake-Siblings – A to Z Blog Challenge

We are pleased to participate in the A to Z Blog Challenge (http://www.a-to-zchallenge.com/). The Story Crossroads theme for this year is Beating the Odds…Lucky Folktales Around the World to Brighten Your Day. Each post highlights that the stars aligned and what would have normally been…bad…turned out after all. Considering what we – as humankind – have experienced the past year, how nice is it to remember that all of us can “beat the odds” to some level in our lives.

And we’ll admit now…some are actually myths, legends, or epics rather than only limited to folktales. So is that a type of “loading the dice”? Ah, but the stories were too wonderful to pass by.

SPIRITS & SNAKES-

From Sioux

The Sioux and the Ojibwe tribes do not always get along. Some people don’t like to use the word “Sioux” as the Ojibwe used that name as a way to call the “Sioux” to be “little snakes.” The original word was “Nadowessioux.” Fur traders shortened the word to “Sioux.” Yet, it’s a name that continues to this day.

What makes spirits dangerous? What makes snakes dangerous?

When spirits talk and tell you to do something, it is already dangerous to not follow directions. In this story, the ones who did not listen are transformed. A spirit could possess you and suddenly there could be two spirits depending on what is forced to be done when possessed. As for snakes, this story features rattlesnakes that actually give you warning because they already know they are dangerous. Whether it’s the bite, venom, or both…stay back when you hear that rattle. So if you don’t listen and respond? Be warned. Huh. Both the spirits and the snakes are best managed when listened to the first time. Interesting.

50-words-or-less summary:

Four brothers kill buffalo. Spirits says to lay skin/skull/hooves in certain way. Only youngest obeys. Other brothers transform into snakes. Snake-siblings live in hole and promise to protect brother and tribe. Youngest after horses and asks for snake medicine. Snake-siblings provide. Youngest then faster and more confidence. Success! Continues today.

That youngest brother was smart to listen to the Spirit (thereby lucky) and take that buffalo skin to the hill and lay out the parts as requested. Though, those other three brothers were lucky to be alive and right their wrongs by protecting the tribe as snakes. Only after learning this story did I find it fascinating on the meaning of “Sioux” and how these snake brothers can be respected despite their initial disobedience.

Finding the Story:

When Lame Deer told it in 1969 – https://www.angelfire.com/ca/Indian/SnakeBrothers.html

When published in book and transcribed/edited by Richard Erdoes in 1976 from Lame Deer – “The Snake Brothers” within The Sound of Flutes and other Indian Legends – also found here online to order: https://www.amazon.com/Sound-flutes-other-Indian-legends/dp/0394831810

Please share in the comments…or anything on your mind. While you enjoy this blog, Story Crossroads has year-round offerings with virtual as well as proper-distanced/masked/outdoors.

We are excited for the monthly All Things Story virtual workshop series as well as the hybrid Story Crossroads Festival on May 10-13, 2021 (then viewing beyond the event to June 15, 2021). Interested in deeper articles and e-workbooks plus stories, activities, and recipes? Then pursue Story Crossroads Memberships.

As we are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, you can also support by donating today!

See a teaser of our Story Crossroads Academy. While the video has closed captioning, the “Storytelling Basics in 8 Hours” is free and includes American Sign Language.

R is for Redeeming Rats – A to Z Blog Challenge

We are pleased to participate in the A to Z Blog Challenge (http://www.a-to-zchallenge.com/). The Story Crossroads theme for this year is Beating the Odds…Lucky Folktales Around the World to Brighten Your Day. Each post highlights that the stars aligned and what would have normally been…bad…turned out after all. Considering what we – as humankind – have experienced the past year, how nice is it to remember that all of us can “beat the odds” to some level in our lives.

And we’ll admit now…some are actually myths, legends, or epics rather than only limited to folktales. So is that a type of “loading the dice”? Ah, but the stories were too wonderful to pass by.

RATS-

From Sudan

It appears that it is bad luck to kill a rat in Sudan…and this story gives a reason why. Though the Nile Rat found in Sudan was studied in 2009 about the parasites carried by the rodent. See that article here: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21392288/.

What makes rats dangerous?

Some people don’t realize that rats are in their homes. They can feel sick and think it’s the flu…when its the rat droppings hitting the air and mix with the dust. Rats can infect humans with hantavirus, ratbite fever, lymphocytic choriomeningitis. Rats often are linked to ectoparasites, plague, murine typhus and Lyme disease.

50-words-or-less summary:

Women cut open when giving birth. Women died. Baby survived. Rat came to village, learned of women dying, and asked for people to wait rather than cut woman open for child. People listened. Baby and mother survived. People wished to reward Rat. Only wanted to share woman’s home and food.

That Rat was lucky to arrive when it did and share another way so both woman and child could survive birthing. That woman was lucky to raise her child and be the first of many women to survive childbirth. While some could point out and blame women for being the reason that rats roam our homes, I prefer to see this as the redemptive story for rats.

Finding the Story:

Read or listen to the story shared by Nyaduong Ruot Duoth – http://www.southsudanesefolktales.org/?project=how-the-woman-and-the-rat-came-to-stay-in-the-same-house

Please share in the comments…or anything on your mind. While you enjoy this blog, Story Crossroads has year-round offerings with virtual as well as proper-distanced/masked/outdoors.

We are excited for the monthly All Things Story virtual workshop series as well as the hybrid Story Crossroads Festival on May 10-13, 2021 (then viewing beyond the event to June 15, 2021). Interested in deeper articles and e-workbooks plus stories, activities, and recipes? Then pursue Story Crossroads Memberships.

As we are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, you can also support by donating today!

See a teaser of our Story Crossroads Academy. While the video has closed captioning, the “Storytelling Basics in 8 Hours” is free and includes American Sign Language.