Short & Sweet Marketing for Story Artists – Tip #5 of 5 – Art of Consistency & Branding

This is the fifth of five parts on how best to manage marketing during this particular time period…or beyond. While Story Crossroads sees “story artists” to typically mean spoken word storytellers, these tips apply to all performing artists or professionals across industries.

5-Tips for 5 Days:

  • Tip 1 – Website – REVEALED
  • Tip 2 – Social Media – REVEALED
  • Tip 3 – E-Newsletter & Email Lists – REVEALED
  • Tip 4 – Ideal Client – REVEALED
  • Tip 5 – Art of Consistency & Branding

You figured everything out – website, social media, E-Newsletter, Email Lists and even your Ideal Client. Now, how much can you be trusted to get things out when you say? How memorable are you?

Consistency deals with accuracy AND timliness.

If you have someone else handle your marketing (a great idea), then that person needs to understand the way you would talk or approach things. They need to be accurate with your personality.

Most likely, you are handling your own marketing. Yet, we can forget how we did it one time and keeping it that way for another similar situation. Can we adapt? Absolutely. Even companies update their logos, images, and mottoes from time to time. However, the most successful transitions are when the coloring/logo/image are close to the original. You can even have a transition plan of tweaking color tones year by year so it is gradual and still recognizable with your fan-base.

Story artists tend to be decent with branding on stage and then forget to use that same branding in all marketing materials. When people click on a link, seeing that imagery is a quick, “Whew! This is who I want!”

Give the people seeking you that affirmation.

Branding can involve objects, wardrobe, repeated phrases and traditions, and colors.

Story Crossroads uses blue/orange throughout what we do. We have a logo. We have t-shirts with “I have a story. You have a story. We all have stories.” for our volunteers, youth and adult community tellers, and our professional story artists. We use that motto on our email signature, our website homepage, and other applicable places. We do our best to be consistent…but our monthly E-Newsletter is really more a bi-monthly than monthly. Everyone can improve…yes, that means, us, too.

Organizations easily have a logo to promote. A story artist often rely on themselves as the brand. This is why at least one picture of the story artist is crucial on the homepage of a website, in the banners on Facebook, upon the header of a E-Newsletter, etc.

Being remembered and being reliable…nothing compares! Except for those paying gigs and opportunities. Believe you can be spectacular.

Quick 5-Question for Consistency & Branding:

  1. Do you have a catch phrase, opening line, ending line, or motto? How often do you use it? Do people expect these traditions?
  2. What colors are associated with you? Can you narrow them down to one color? Two colors? If you consider “all colors,” then are you consistent in using “all colors” clearly in all marketing or communications regarding you and your work?
  3. Is there a type of storytelling, art, music, dance, movement that you specialize in? Even with skills in other areas, is it clear about your niche?
  4. Do you have scheduled website updates at least once every two weeks? If less than this time-frame, then please add this to your “to do” list. Do you have scheduled social media? Each platform is different on what is expected. Facebook is best with no more than 3 posts a day. Twitter is at least 15 posts a day. Answers will vary. Here is some guidance from an article from 14 studies. You can even have software to help you in the planning and saving groupings of hashtags to save time. See an article “The 25 Best Social Media Management Tools for Businesses of All Sizes” by Alfred Lua/Buffer (11-minute read). Do you keep your promise of having a monthly E-Newsletter or whatever length of time you said?
  5. Did you consider AND actually send press releases as a story artist? Organization? Both, if it applies? Any event you are connected with…even if you are not the host? You need to be familiar with journalists and keep a rapport. You can send a press release every other week or at least monthly. That is NOT too much. If you don’t send press releases at all…commit!

Story Artists who have Branding:

  • Donald Davishttps://www.ddavisstoryteller.com/ – has the bowtie on stage as well as key image on his website – dresses up to honor his audience though the bowtie has an edge of surprise/fun to it – matches with his personal/family stories
  • Barbara Schutzgruberhttps://weavestory.wordpress.com/ – she is a weaver of silks and threads as well as stories – imagery works nicely together – she wears what she has woven when weaving stories – reminds this connection in all she does
  • Diane Ferlattehttp://www.dianeferlatte.com/ – has “the stick” or “talking stick” on stage and pounds out rhythm, often accompanied by Erik Pearson – could use this imagery more prominently for website and marketing materials

Story Artists with Consistency? Harder to Determine.

The best way is if a story artists declares, “Yes, I do send out every other week, once a month, etc.” We will let you ponder who feels consistent and focused on keeping you informed. Hopefully, you can count yourself.

If you want me to give initial thoughts on your consistency and branding and do not mind well-intended bluntness, I am open to letting you know if you email info@storycrossroads.org. Yes, this is complimentary.

Follow our next 5-part blog series entitled “How to Best Use the Story Crossroads Discord Server.”

The Story Crossroads Server on Discord has text/vocal/video chat options plus resources and ideas. Click here for the direct invite/link.

Find our E-Newsletter and Email List Sign-Ups on our website home page at the bottom, the archive page, etc.

See our already-streamed/recorded The Big Why Panel: Historical Storytelling meets Humanities

See our 5-video playlist from the Story Crossroads Spectacular by clicking here

Short & Sweet Marketing for Story Artists – Tip #4 of 5 – Ideal Client

This is the fourth of five parts on how best to manage marketing during this particular time period…or beyond. While Story Crossroads sees “story artists” to typically mean spoken word storytellers, these tips apply to all performing artists or professionals across industries.

5-Tips for 5 Days:

  • Tip 1 – Website – REVEALED
  • Tip 2 – Social Media – REVEALED
  • Tip 3 – E-Newsletter & Email Lists – REVEALED
  • Tip 4 – Ideal Client – TODAY
  • Tip 5 – Art of Consistency & Branding

Who is the one that NEEDS to find you and participate and sign-up for your paid courses or performances? That ideal client

Do you see how everything is building on each other? You need the website, social media, and the E-Newsletters and Email Lists to get to the Ideal Client. This is more than a favorite audience member.

This is the person who learns that you are doing something–a grand idea, a premiere performance, you-name-it–and automatically wants to sign-up and pay anything to make it happen.

Ah, we love the Ideal Client.

Most of the time, people are marketing to “everyone.”

But “everyone” cannot come. Or participate. Or listen.

Yes, you will have advertising that seems like it is for everyone. Get past that feeling. You have an audience as a performing artist. You have a target audience as a marketer of your small business of storytelling.

For Story Crossroads, our idea client would be a 9th grade high school/junior high teacher (depends on the geography) who has always used storytelling in the classroom. This person believes in enhancing the experience with virtual or live field trips and then wants their students to do a short yet fun assignment in connection to it. This teacher resides in Salt Lake County, Utah. And loves libraries, museums, is an avid attender of performing arts…and loves mango juice.

Are we open to other high school teachers of the 10th, 11th, or 12th grades? Yes. Do the people need to be teachers to work with us? No. Are we adamant about only Salt Lake County people? No. We have done virtual and that breaks borders already. And must they love mango juice. OK. That’s a deal-breaker.

All right, that was a tease. BUT, you want to be as detailed as possible. Then, you think what groups, associations, or other places this person can be found. Can your marketing messages connect there somehow?

Quick 10-Question for Ideal Client Audit:

  1. What generation of people do you always wish to work with? What is your historical record of who you have been hired by? Now break it down by the decade this group/generation comes from. Year? Age? Were you able to figure this out within 10 seconds…or do you need to ponder this longer? If needing more time, consider the group you would jump at the chance to have commissioned work/performances, etc.
  2. What are favorite hobbies and interests of this person/group? What organizations and associations can you research that these people would love to join?
  3. What is the routine like for this person/group? Favorite foods? Favorite music? (think radio stations as well as styles)
  4. What are common-held beliefs of this person/group? Feelings on the current events? Feelings of the past? Feelings of the future? Remember that beliefs does not have to connect to religions. Think core standards.
  5. What cultures and sub-cultures is this person/group part of? This past blog post of ours delves into Cultural Studies/Humanities if you need ideas of what to consider.
  6. What methods of communication does this person/group prefer? Texting? Emails? Phone Calls? Actual Letters/Mail? In-person (properly distanced, of course)? Zoom one-on-one meetings? Other ways?
  7. What would you guess are favorite words of this person/group? Do they love “bonus” or “add-on” or “experience” or any number of words?
  8. What geographic zone(s) will you find this person/group? Do NOT say everywhere. Really think. Urban? Suburban? Rural? Lives near an active arts community? University-city? Specific cities? Specific states? Countries? Continent? Again, you cannot say every continent. You can be open to all BUT market to the specific Ideal Client.
  9. What benefits is your Ideal Client seeking from you? What draws them the most to what you have to offer?
  10. How can you apply all these answers into your website, social media, E-Newsletters, Email Lists, etc.?

Story Artists who know their Ideal Client

  • Charlotte Blake Alstonwww.charlotteblakealston.com – see how she focuses on commissioned works, her skills as a storyteller or West African tradition as well as being a librettist – imagery/pictures chosen reflect what works best for Ideal Client

  • Sean Buvalahttps://seantells.com/morethanspeaking/ – yes, you can go to seantells.com though this particular web address proves that he knows his Ideal Client…and able to teach people that skill – business/marketing/storytelling is his forte – clear that he works with Chambers of Commerce, businesses of all kinds/mainly small businesses

  • Antonio Sacrehttps://www.antoniosacre.com/ – he is a split-personality storyteller…and he knows it – he has family-friendly material and promotes his authorship and bilingual abilities while also having space for the older audiences and things that are edgy – this can be hard to represent in a website (almost needs a two-face approach on homepage without scrolling) BUT he knows his Ideal Client(s)

If you want me to give initial thoughts on your Ideal Client (or at least impressions looking at your marketing materials) and do not mind well-intended bluntness, I am open to letting you know if you email info@storycrossroads.org. Yes, this is complimentary.

Find our E-Newsletter and Email List Sign-Ups on our website home page at the bottom, the archive page, etc.

See our already-streamed/recorded The Big Why Panel: Historical Storytelling meets Humanities with three options to watch it featuring our panelists: Dr. Caroliese Frink Reed, Sheila Arnold, Darci Tucker, and Brian “Fox” Ellis. We are grateful to funding from Utah Humanities.

See our 5-video playlist from the Story Crossroads Spectacular by clicking here

If you really want to experiment with us, we have the Story Crossroads Server on Discord with text/vocal/video chat options plus resources and ideas. Click here for the direct invite/link.

Short & Sweet Marketing for Story Artists – Tip #3 of 5 – E-Newsletter & Email Lists

This is the third of five parts on how best to manage marketing during this particular time period…or beyond. While Story Crossroads sees “story artists” to typically mean spoken word storytellers, these tips apply to all performing artists or professionals across industries.

5-Tips for 5 Days:

  • Tip 1 – Website – REVEALED
  • Tip 2 – Social Media – REVEALED
  • Tip 3 – E-Newsletter & Email Lists – TODAY
  • Tip 4 – Ideal Client
  • Tip 5 – Art of Consistency & Branding

E-Newsletters and Emails Lists reflect your ultimate fans, and every artist needs fans

For certain dreams and ventures, you need that fan base. Want to succeed with live events? Virtual events? Want a Patreon or other monthly subscriptions like Twitch from those who love what you do? You need people every time. Not a random person. A person dedicated and willing to follow, and, eventually commit funds. To You. To Your Art.

What is the difference between E-Newsletters and Email Lists? As shared in this article written by Kim Cohen with Remarkety, E-Newsletters are to “engage and educate” and focus on “news” while Email Lists are about “sales.”

Always grow your E-Newsletters and Email Lists organically. Never buy lists. These need to be people who have experienced what you do in one way or another. Acquaintances, collaborators, funders, sponsors, and volunteers also fall within “experienced what you do.”

Every event, website, social media, and live and virtual networking MUST provide opportunities for people to choose to sign up. You need at least SEVEN PLACES that people can sign up or connect with you such as: website homepage; website archives/own page; email signature; feedback forms; follow-up emails; hints in advertising literature; written details and/or spoken for any video, audio, or other media shared. Possibilities are endless. When we had live networking, I always carried a clipboard with the sign-up for E-Newsletter as well as our email lists.

Yes, you can have more than one email list. Then you can specialize or honor why people are following in the first place. Are they beyond your geography? Are they local and can collaborate easier? Do they only want events? Do they prefer how-to?

Start at least with one E-Newsletter (more paragraph/event/content focus) and one Email List (regular as well as quick announcements). Get more targeted, “complicated,” and efficient as the years go on.

Quick 5-Question for E-Newsletter Audit:

  1. Do you have an E-Newsletter? If not, you need to fix that now. Do not worry if you only send to a handful of family/friends at first. Grow it from there. Everyone starts with “zero” but everything later is always more. And ALWAYS permission-based.
  2. How do you send out your E-Newsletter? Do you use “normal” email or have you invested in an email service such as Constant Contact, Mailchimp (some bad PR lately), etc.? See “10 Best Email Marketing Services for Small Business” by Hosting Facts/Brad Smith put out 4/29/2020. The one we use and enjoy is ranked #8 – Aweber. Do you study the analytics and know the percentage who open, what days, times, etc? Then, do you make any adjustments with this knowledge? Most people open our emails on Wednesdays mornings. Our smartest posts are geared slightly before that ideal time. And…the average open rate needs to be at least 15-25% and click rate needs to be at least 2.5% (like those links/web addresses for call-to-action).
  3. How often do you send out your E-Newsletter? How good are you at keeping that “promise” of being monthly, quarterly, etc. Having is twice or once year…is sad. Please commit at least quarterly with a goal to become monthly. If done more often, will people be annoyed or do they welcome this constant communication? Annoyance leads to unsubscribes from people and/or complaints. THOUGH, not having an easy “unsubscribe” button makes people nervous. People like the ability to choose even if they intend to be “forever followers.”
  4. Besides upcoming events, what content are you sharing that someone can use no matter if this E-Newsletter was opened the same day it went out? If opened/read a week later? A month later? A year or more later? Do people have access to your archives if they missed, joined much later, etc.?
  5. Are your goals and ideals easily understood by someone within and beyond your performing arts world? Do you use lingo or phrases that need to be explained? Ex. Someone may not understand what is meant by a “story swap”? Do you abbreviations assuming people know what is meant such as putting “NSN” instead of “National Storytelling Network”? The rule? Never assume.

Quick 5-Question for Email Lists (Some Repeats):

  1. How many Email Lists do you have? None is an unacceptable answer. You need at least one. By five years, you probably will have two or more. Consider the types of announcements and call-to-actions that people would want? Workshop participant sign-ups? Concert-goers? Connected more for donations? Pure fan with a vague financial commitment?
  2. How do you send out your Email Lists? Do you use “bcc” or “cc”? Are you great about privacy? Remember, your E-Newsletters and Email Lists could be coming from the save service. See #2 for E-Newsletters above.
  3. How often do you send out your Email Lists? Again, see #3 for E-Newsletters. DIFFERENT AVERAGE OPEN/CLICK RATES – Do you have the ability to see if at least 20-30% are opening the emails with 20% or more of THAT clicking/opening links? Ponder reasons and re-do wording/approach if not getting those numbers.
  4. Have you created specific email marketing campaigns? Have no idea what that means or what you need to do? No worries…check out this article “19 Examples of Brilliant Email Marketing Campaigns” by Lindsay Kolowich. (Does warn you at top that this is a 17-minute read.)
  5. Is it obvious what your Call-to-Action is within the email? Then…do people have access to your archives if they missed, joined much later, etc.?

High Quality Storytelling E-Newsletters:

  • International Storytelling Center – Sign-Up at bottom right of website homepage – comes out monthly – mix of news with resources/video/something
  • Connie Regan-Blake – Sign-Up is merged with the Contact Form on bottom of website homepage, say “Interested in Newsletter” from drop-down menu
  • John McCutcheon – Sign-Up is on left-center of website homepage, mentions how often and expectations with this phrase “Monthly updates on shows, sales, future projects and more!”

High Quality Storytelling Email Lists:

  • Timpanogos Storytelling – Pop-Up to join Email Lists after hanging out on website for about 10 seconds – comes out as needed, does not have a regular schedule, yet when it does come it, visuals are stunning
  • StoryCorps – Can be found on bottom of website homepage – comes out weekly – always call-to-action of “donate” at the bottom – instead of Pop-Up when going to website to the Email List/Newsletter (they have combined approach), their Pop-Up is about donating
  • Please keep in mind that individual story artists can also have high quality email lists. Many performers forget to have an Unsubscribe button and/or Email Marketing Service and/or do not add any images, etc. Let me know if you feel like your email list(s) passes the audit. We want to be part of it.

If you want me to give initial thoughts on your E-Newsletter or Email List(s) and do not mind well-intended bluntness, I am open to letting you know if you email info@storycrossroads.org. Yes, this is complimentary. Also, if we are not already part of your E-Newsletter or Email list, you have our permission to add us if you are a story artist and/or story organization. You’re welcome.

Yes, you can find our E-Newsletter and Email List Sign-Ups on our website home page at the bottom, the archive page, etc.

See our already-streamed/recorded The Big Why Panel: Historical Storytelling meets Humanities with three options to watch it featuring our panelists: Dr. Caroliese Frink Reed, Sheila Arnold, Darci Tucker, and Brian “Fox” Ellis. We are grateful to funding from Utah Humanities.

See our 5-video playlist from the Story Crossroads Spectacular by clicking here

If you really want to experiment with us, we have the Story Crossroads Server on Discord with text/vocal/video chat options plus resources and ideas. Click here for the direct invite/link.

Short & Sweet Marketing for Story Artists – Tip #2 of 5 – Social Media

This is the second of five parts on how best to manage marketing during this particular time period…or beyond. While Story Crossroads sees “story artists” to typically mean spoken word storytellers, these tips apply to all performing artists or professionals across industries.

5-Tips for 5 Days:

  • Tip 1 – Website – REVEALED
  • Tip 2 – Social Media – TODAY
  • Tip 3 – E-Newsletter & Email Lists
  • Tip 4 – Ideal Client
  • Tip 5 – Art of Consistency & Branding

With so many choices on social media, have at least one that is “strong.” Yet, you need a website to receive the full benefits of social media…

Your social media needs to drive people away from the hustle and bustle of the constant chatting and texting and voices of everyone.

The goal for any social media is to get to your website so that they can contact you about performance opportunities. Or buy your CDS and books. Or any number of revenue-building activities.

If you allow your people to “hang” on social media too long, they will eventually become distracted by something else. Blogs are considered social media though are part of your website so has the benefit of having people already at your website to explore.

Other forms of social media besides blogs: Facebook, YouTube, Instagram (plus many more icons) as well as picture-sharing, vlogs, wall-postings, email, instant messaging, music-sharing (can be story-sharing), crowdsourcing, and voice over IP, podcasting, etc.

Luckily, you do not have to be on or doing every single social media. Unless you have the volunteer or paid office people to give attention and care to it. Or interns. Ah, love interns–who tend to be up on the latest trends and ever-ready to share their knowledge and skills.

Paying someone at least $10/hour once a week could be worth it…if they can match your “voice” and style in communicating online.

Quick 5-Question Social Media Audit:

  1. Do you have YouTube and are you using it? Asking for subscribers? Adding material at least once a quarter (once a month, once a week or more is awesome)? Of all the social media, YouTube is on the “required” list to best showcase your art and easier for people to write grants and prove your ability to committees.
  2. Is there at least one other social media besides YouTube that you could commit regular time/postings? Consider your ideal client (will get more to that for tip#4). Click here for a basic idea from Flint Group – keep in mind this changes all the time.
  3. Are there any social media you do that you could drop to free up more time to emphasize your best one(s)? Or at least do automatic linkage such as Instagram/Facebook or any other combination? Best to post separately/per social media…but can “cheat.”
  4. Are you familiar with the up-and-coming platforms? Have you considered Twitch? Tik Tok? Discord? You do not need to be “on” these new ones, but are you willing to test them out? Ponder on what highlights storytelling and your work the best.
  5. Do you follow and analyze other storytelling, performing arts, and people of other industries and see what is working? What is not? Can you apply this to you?

Story Artists & Organizations Who Know How to Use Social Media to their Advantage:

Up & Coming on Social Media Buzz:

  • Tim Lowry – YouTube – he put out a goal to have at least 1,000 YouTube Subscribers so he can stream in a more effective way (was at 787 on 7/4/2020) – he will want to customize his YouTube domain name to have his name after “youtube.com” as he reached the minimum 100 subscribers to do so
  • Brian “Fox” Ellis – YouTube as Fox Tales International – while in the new stages, he has AMAZING production value and a plan/schedule in place, within 24 hours he had over 100 subscribers (was at 143 on 7/4/2020) – he will want to customize his YouTube domain name to have his name after “youtube.com” as he reached the minimum 100 subscribers to do so

If you want me to give initial thoughts on how you are doing with social media and do not mind well-intended bluntness, I am open to letting you know if you email info@storycrossroads.org. Yes, this is complimentary.

See our already-streamed/recorded The Big Why Panel: Historical Storytelling meets Humanities with three options to watch it featuring our panelists: Dr. Caroliese Frink Reed, Sheila Arnold, Darci Tucker, and Brian “Fox” Ellis. We are grateful to funding from Utah Humanities.

See our 5-video playlist from the Story Crossroads Spectacular by clicking here

If you really want to experiment with us, we have the Story Crossroads Server on Discord with text/vocal/video chat options plus resources and ideas. Click here for the direct invite/link.

Short & Sweet Marketing for Story Artists – Tip #1 of 5 – Website

This is the first of five parts on how best to manage marketing during this particular time period…or beyond. While Story Crossroads sees “story artists” to typically mean spoken word storytellers, these tips apply to all performing artists or professionals across industries.

5-Tips for 5 Days:

  • Tip 1 – Website – TODAY
  • Tip 2 – Social Media
  • Tip 3 – E-Newsletter & Email Lists
  • Tip 4 – Ideal Client
  • Tip 5 – Art of Consistency & Branding

Please have a website and do not have “Facebook” count as your landing page…

When I search for a story artist as a producer of events and grant writer, I am hoping that their website comes up first. Or that a website even shows up.

I have been flabbergasted.

Now, I promised to have this be a “short and sweet” series so I will leave some of my reasoning out. Though, I am trying to secure funding FOR YOU through grants, sponsorship, or other means. NOT having a website greatly hurts me. So…help me, help you, help me.

Oh, and I will be blunt. Nothing will be “sweet” except for the tastiness of your website if you take the advice hinted by this audit.

Quick 10-Question Website Audit:

  1. What do you see when you go to your homepage WITHOUT scrolling? Do the most important parts show up? Are the headers easy-to-read and obvious?
  2. Do the CRISP images used on the website, especially the homepage, reflect what you do? If you tell stories, is that clear? If you dance? If you teach? If you play instruments?
  3. Do you have 1-3 images to represent who you are on the home page? Any more than that…crowded!
  4. Is your Press Kit actually labeled “Press Kit” or “Press”? Don’t have one? That is a major issue you need to fix now.
  5. Does your website use a slider feature on the home page? This was popular about a decade ago. Styles and tastes change in marketing. If yours has a slider, get rid of it now.
  6. Do you have font styles and sizes that work with the people who need to read your site? Large enough, not too fancy, could be helpful for those who are dyslexic, proper and dark enough font color according to background color, etc.
  7. Do you have written, audio, and video (closed captioning) options?
  8. Where are your social media icons so people can follow you? Easy to find? Not even there? What!?!
  9. Do you have an updated calendar of your events? Calendars are not required. If you have a hard time keeping it up to date (or embarrassed), then don’t worry about having it. Better to be updated or not have one at all.
  10. Is it obvious that this is an “active” site with new blog feeds, social media feeds, polishing/buffering of wording?

You may be surprised that the biggest names in storytelling often cannot pass this website audit. Word-of-mouth has been your friend. If you do have rockstar status in the storytelling world, have your professionalism match through your website. If you do not have rockstar status though want to improve and even wish to get there, then have your high-quality storytelling match your high-quality website. That simple.

Scoured Many Storyteller Websites…Only One Passed:

Awards for Most Improved Websites & Still Great:

  • Bil Lepp – www.leppstorytelling.com – still would like to see some tweaks though WAY better than in the “early years” – would like to see “Bio & Press” separated for ease of finding – “Bio” is linked more with “About” – do love his new branding and use of “BL” in several places, super smart

  • Mara Menzies – www.marathestoryteller.com – still need a “Press” and have to click “Menu” to get the headers – amazing visuals and smart re-branding, also easy to see the site is “active” – her old website will need to feed into this new one so it is the same no matter which one people use – almost has “slider” feel for homepage but could work (perhaps slow down how often it switches?) or stick to one intriguing image (like the gold paint – super captivating)

  • Donna Washington – www.dlwstoryteller.com – great visually, need more readable and larger font for headers, need “Press”

If you want me to give initial thoughts and do not mind well-intended bluntness, I am open to letting you know if you email info@storycrossroads.org. Yes, this is complimentary.

See our already-streamed/recorded The Big Why Panel: Historical Storytelling meets Humanities with three options to watch it featuring our panelists: Dr. Caroliese Frink Reed, Sheila Arnold, Darci Tucker, and Brian “Fox” Ellis. We are grateful to funding from Utah Humanities.

See our 5-video playlist from the Story Crossroads Spectacular by clicking here

If you really want to experiment with us, we have the Story Crossroads Server on Discord with text/vocal/video chat options plus resources and ideas. Click here for the direct invite/link.