W is for Wounded Wiles

We are pleased to participate in the A to Z Blog Challenge (http://www.a-to-zchallenge.com/). The Story Crossroads theme for this year is Dual Natures in Folktales Around the World – opposites, contradictions & paradoxes.

WILES-

From Armenia

Storks are plentiful in Armenia. Some locals call these congregating spots of storks as villages. These same storks are protective of sparrows. As this story features a sparrow that is constantly being helped (and taking advantage of people’s kindness), I find it interesting that no storks are in the story.

But how did sparrows get so crafty and full of wiles? Well, Chess is required to learn and take in school. Yes, this is for human youth. But perhaps the sparrows watch as the game is taught and played?

What is so fascinating? What dualities have surfaced?

Most of us have a hard time asking for help. Then there’s Sparrow. He took advantage of people’s kindness. Once he figured out the “rhythm,” he could take something, knowing that people would get tempted, and then demand payment. Hmmm.

So the cute and little Sparrow can be conniving and wily. And carry a sheep or bride, mind you. Much more than he appears.

Yet, when we are two-faced, we should not be surprised when karma comes to get us. I admit, there was satisfaction in the Sparrow getting a thorn again at the end by sitting on a prickly branch. But I feel guilty, because even then, I don’t like anyone coming to harm.

Does that make me two-faced?

50-word-or-less summary:

Thorn! Sparrow begged. Woman tossed thorn in fire. Sparrow insisted – HIS thorn. Payment! Given bread. Took bread to man to “watch” while away. Ate bread. Payment! Given sheep. Wedding. “Watch” sheep. Guests ate. Payment! Given bride. Minstrel “watch” bride. Distracted by own songs. Bride runs. Given lute. Branch. Thorn!

Finding the Story: 

Book entitled “The Greedy Sparrow” – found here

Study Guide and Questions for Story – found here

Video of LIza Manoyan reading the story in Armenian – found here

Please share thoughts in the comments. While you enjoy this blog, Story Crossroads has year-round offerings. See quick list of programs here.

As for our past A to Z Challenges…

While you enjoy this blog, Story Crossroads has been “dual” in our offerings of our hybrid summit & festival on May 9-12, 2022 – yes, in-person and virtual – and would be honored for you to join us. Explore the schedule and register here: http://www.storycrossroads.org/Festival

Thanks to funding from National Endowment for the Arts; National Endowment for the Humanities; Western States Arts Federation; Utah Division of Arts and Museums/Utah Legislature; Utah Humanities; Youth, Educators, Storytellers (YES); City of Murray; Zoo, Arts & Parks (ZAP) of Salt Lake County; Salt Lake City Arts Council; Clever Octopus; High Desert Brain Trust; Ashton Family Foundation; and people like you.

V is for Voracious Vegetarian

We are pleased to participate in the A to Z Blog Challenge (http://www.a-to-zchallenge.com/). The Story Crossroads theme for this year is Dual Natures in Folktales Around the World – opposites, contradictions & paradoxes.

VEGETARIAN-

From Peru / Andes Mountains

So many wonderful foods in Peru – and most include meat. One of the most classic? Guinea Pig also known as Cuy. This meat is a delicacy that pre-dates the Incans. People could breed Guinea Pig faster and it was healthier overall.

However, here are two dishes without meat: Papas a la Huancaina (Potatoes in Spicy Cheese Sauce), Rocoto Relleno (Stuffed Spicy Peppers). And it was hard to find recipes without meat.

What is so fascinating? What dualities have surfaced?

Knowing how popular Guinea Pig meat is in Peru, I love seeing the Guinea Pig be the trickster. We see Raven or Rabbit as tricksters. We recently talked about the Terrapin/Turtle. When the usual-dish-on-the-table becomes the hero, tell me more!

Small size brings about big brains. Vegetarian fights off against Meat-Eater.

50-word-or-less summary:

Cuy holds up edge of rock. Invites Fox to hold sky to give break. Fox tires. Let’s go. Nothing. Rain of fire! Digs hole. Nothing. Cuy dresses as human. Helps in alfalfa fields. Eats at night. Sap-doll catches Cuy. Human ties Cuy to tree. Tricks Fox to be tied up.

Finding the Story: 

Book entitled “The Guinea Pig and the Fox” – found here

Online story of “The Fox and the Cunning Cuy (Guinea Pig)” – found here

Video of Rebecca Knudson sharing picture book of this story – found here

Please share thoughts in the comments. While you enjoy this blog, Story Crossroads has year-round offerings. See quick list of programs here.

As for our past A to Z Challenges…

While you enjoy this blog, Story Crossroads has been “dual” in our offerings of our hybrid summit & festival on May 9-12, 2022 – yes, in-person and virtual – and would be honored for you to join us. Explore the schedule and register here: http://www.storycrossroads.org/Festival

Thanks to funding from National Endowment for the Arts; National Endowment for the Humanities; Western States Arts Federation; Utah Division of Arts and Museums/Utah Legislature; Utah Humanities; Youth, Educators, Storytellers (YES); City of Murray; Zoo, Arts & Parks (ZAP) of Salt Lake County; Salt Lake City Arts Council; Clever Octopus; High Desert Brain Trust; Ashton Family Foundation; and people like you.

U is for Ubiquitous Untrue

We are pleased to participate in the A to Z Blog Challenge (http://www.a-to-zchallenge.com/). The Story Crossroads theme for this year is Dual Natures in Folktales Around the World – opposites, contradictions & paradoxes.

UNTRUE-

From a Norse tale

You may see “Norse” and automatically think “Viking.” Not always true. Vikings were between the 8th and 11th Centuries. Norse can be that time period and older. While both come from Scandinavia, the Norse eventually spread to France, Greenland, Britain and even North America. The Vikings spread forth to more Scotland, Ireland, and England.

The Norse traded and spoke Old Norse or Old Icelandic. The Vikings traded – a little – but also known for looting. The Vikings spoke English, Old English, and sometimes Old Norse.

No wonder it’s confusing!

What is so fascinating? What dualities have surfaced?

We have brothers. I am not sure if they are twins, but the mother chooses for both of them to be “kicked out” at the same time. She probably was most sad to have True go as he was helpful and kind. Though, being a mother, both were loved. Isn’t it interesting when we have opposite personalities even when raised by the same mom?

Untrue chose to take both of True’s eyes. Talk about a terrible brother. Amazingly, True still was kind and shared with his brother how he found out the secrets to cure himself later on. Even which lime tree! Thus, True and Untrue remained with their natures to the end. With the appropriate consequences.

50-word-or-less summary:

Untrue and True (brothers) sent off. Untrue tricked brother. True pointed out Untrue would live to his name. Untrue took True’s eyes! True climbed tree. Animals talked-how to cure (spring) and of princess (deaf/dumb). Helped self and princess. Married! Untrue discovered how. Sat in tree. Animals refused to share secrets.

Finding the Story: 

Book entitled “True and Untrue and Other Norse Tales” – found here

Online sharing of the story – found here

Video of Melva Gifford telling the story – found here

Please share thoughts in the comments. While you enjoy this blog, Story Crossroads has year-round offerings. See quick list of programs here.

As for our past A to Z Challenges…

While you enjoy this blog, Story Crossroads has been “dual” in our offerings of our hybrid summit & festival on May 9-12, 2022 – yes, in-person and virtual – and would be honored for you to join us. Explore the schedule and register here: http://www.storycrossroads.org/Festival

Thanks to funding from National Endowment for the Arts; National Endowment for the Humanities; Western States Arts Federation; Utah Division of Arts and Museums/Utah Legislature; Utah Humanities; Youth, Educators, Storytellers (YES); City of Murray; Zoo, Arts & Parks (ZAP) of Salt Lake County; Salt Lake City Arts Council; Clever Octopus; High Desert Brain Trust; Ashton Family Foundation; and people like you.