Cap’s Off to You!-Anneliese Konkol (Posthumously) and Celebrating Story

Featuring:  Anneliese Konkol (Posthumously)

Storyteller, Actress, Friend

Anneliese Konkol has been on my mind lately. She was one of the first names I honored when we shared different Story Artists who have passed on during a recent video chat on Discord. I was honored for her daughter to grant me with a whole bin of props and items that she used when telling stories on stage. The sister promised me that Anneliese herself wished me to have these things when she was fading in the hospital. While she lay there, I was given the room alone. I sung the song “Barges” as my parting gift to her as she already had given so much to mean with her friendships, many one-on-one chats in Wendy’s and a burger, and planning of the Weber State University Storytelling Festival.

The following interview is thanks to fellow Storyteller and Story Crossroads Board Member Laurie Allen that took place many years ago. Some of this has been on display during the Weber State University Storytelling Festival.

As Laurie Allen explained –

Anneliese Konkol was a premier storyteller in the Ogden and northern Utah area for many years. She learned the art of storytelling from her mother and an aunt in her native Germany. Story was used to help keep the children calm while spending time in the air raid shelters during World War II. Anneliese was also a professional actress on the stage in Berlin and taught at Weber State University.

Laurie: What would you say is the important skill for beginning storytellers to learn?

Anneliese: Make sure to pick one story and know it inside and out. You should know it to perfection. If you do this and know the sequences, the battle is half won. Then tell it to yourself; tell it to your kids, your husband, the kids at the park, your cat or your dog.

Laurie: How do you go about preparing a story?

Anneliese: There is a difference between just preparing a new story and preparing for a particular audience or event. First, I choose an appropriate story for the audience. Then I tell it to myself day and night. I tell it in front of the mirror to see movements and mannerisms. I check some of the phrases with different voices for characters. I watch people in stores and other public places to create characters. Then I imitate their voices and actions.

Laurie: How many stories should be in a teller’s repertoire?

Anneliese: I have about 73-76 that I have total control over.

Laurie: What is your favorite part of being a storyteller?

Anneliese: The results are my favorite part, when I meet children afterward and they tell me they like the stories, or when the audience doesn’t want me to leave.

Laurie: What advice do you have for storytellers?

Anneliese: I feel that you should encourage others to be storytellers; know your story to perfection; make sure your story really address your particular audience; and look like a storyteller. You should have something that sets you apart from everyone else. It has to be individual. Tune in to your listeners. Watch your audience and listen to what they say. What stories do they want over and over? Then you can pick stories that are similar.

There is a lot more to storytelling than just standing up there and telling a story. Voice is important. You need to catch your audience’s attention. You need to project. Your voice needs to be pleasant to listen to. It should be varied for different characters. Try getting in front of a mirror and being that character for a few sentences. There is such an intimacy in storytelling. You need to find your place, your voice.

Anneliese Konkol and Laurie Allen have been involved with the Ben Lomond chapter of the Utah Storytelling Guild for many years and have told at many of the same events throughout Northern Utah. Laurie and everyone in Utah and beyond have enjoyed having Anneliese as a mentor, coach, and friend. Now more people beyond Utah can get to know her a little better.

Anneliese died on February 20, 2012. While at the “Celebration of Life” on March 2, 2012 – this was touching on the program: In lieu of flowers, the family wishes donations be made to the Weber State University Storytelling Festival.

As for me, I will always connect the Gunny Wolf story with her. I will always imagine the different colored flowers that the girl picked. I can hear her voice. I can feel her hug. Oh, I miss her. I am glad I will see her again after my earth journey has ended.

I appreciate Anneliese for the influence of yesterday, today, and forever in storytelling and her way of engaging kids and adults alike with those words “Good night, stars. Good night moon. Good night, boys and girls.” Good night, Anneliese.

Anneliese still has a story.  You have a story.  We all have stories.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s